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Scott Usry: We need to continue to be students of the game as senior operators and lead the way in developing the tactics and techniques that will define our legacy in the tactical world.

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Scott Usry is Director of Training at GTI Government Training Institut in Barnwell, South Carolina (USA).

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How to develop tactics that will define our legacy

The Article

As a young operator, I remember emulating the senior guys on the team that I looked up to.

At the time, I did not understand WHY these guys would move and handle their weapons the way they did.

I looked up to them and wanted to be accepted into their world so I just worked hard to do things the way they did because imitation is the greatest form of flattery.

As I have grown as an operator and had the opportunity to work with some of the best operators from the civilian world, Law Enforcement, and the Military, I have grown to understand the WHY behind the how.

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Smooth is Fast!

This is one of the many sayings that new operators hear every time they go to training…

… but what does this really mean?

To put it in simple terms the smoother we complete our tasks, the faster we can move to the next area of work.

The way we accomplish this is by becoming the most efficient we can be!

We start to understand that economy of motion is a byproduct of the economy of effort and everything we do while operating needs to be as effortless as possible.

This effortlessness is only developed by honing our skillsets through countless hours of practice and understanding how to move through our environment efficiently.

Little things like making sure we are pointing our hips toward the direction of the threshold during Close Quarters Battle or driving our hips from one target to another during target transitions on the firing range help us understand how important body dynamics are.

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This is how we have always done things!

This statement is the death of growth and improvement!

As a new operator, I was told to do what I was told and not ask too many questions.

This may be the old-school mentality that a lot of us grew up with, but this mentality hinders personal and professional growth.

Asking questions and developing an understanding of WHY we do certain things is the goal of our training.

The understanding of WHY is the difference between being a person who trains and a person who is truly trained.

We as professional operators need to be truly trained and prepared to handle whatever demands our missions throw at us.

You are the Weapon!

The equipment that we carry, including our firearms, are nothing more than tools of the trade, the operator is the only true weapon.

We need to gain an understanding of how to manipulate our patrol rifles and handguns around in our work environments to make our movements more efficient.

Most law enforcement officers are taught the sul position or low ready position when learning how to clear rooms in their basic training.

We are told that it is unsafe to raise the gun into a high ready position because if we have an accidental discharge, we might shoot our teammate in the head.

While this can possibly happen, what we should teach the new operators is how the four general firearm safety rules apply to anytime we handle firearms.

The high ready position along with several other shooting positions are viable and important parts of an operator’s arsenal and should be taught and when to use them, the WHY behind the tactics should be up to them.

If we don’t share this history with our new operators…

The operators of today have the fortune of learning from the mistakes that we, senior guys, have made over the years.

Our experience has been developed through hard and sometimes bad decisions and the learning processes that came with them.

If we don’t share this history with our new operators they will be doomed to repeat the same mistakes.

This does nothing to improve our profession and help those who can’t help themselves.

We need to continue to be students of the game as senior operators and lead the way in developing the tactics and techniques that will define our legacy in the tactical world.

The Operator

Special Edition February 2022: Tactical Training

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Photos by Dave Young | GTI

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